Tool Chest By Paul Sellers Part 4, hardware and tools, complete.

With the top and carcass complete, drawers are done.  Its time for hardware, shellac and tools!

Lets start with Brusso hinges. A separate blog post covers these but they are so well made they deem mention again.  The machining is fantastic and all the specs are on their website.  I picked up this set form toolsforworkingwood.com.  The install was a learning experience.  Brass wood screws do not like hardwood.  They like soft pine.  Solution, use a steel screw first then replace it with a brass screw.  Sounds intuitive, its not :).  It took be 4 broken screws before I got this down solid.

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After the hinges were installed I added brass chains on both sides for added support.  The lid is quite heavy so every extra bit helps.

Hinges are hand forged iron hings from Black Bear Forge.  These are some solid handles that can support the weight of this tool chest.  This chest is meant to be moved.  The other choices on the internet were disappointing as most could not hold any weight.  The remaining available ones at the hardware store and amazon had no style or character.  After all the work on the chest I wanted something that stood out.

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Lid is installed with the Brusso Hinges and the handles are attached and a few coats of garnet shellac from Tools for Working Wood and a coat or two of bowling alley wax.

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I did not have many shots of the drawers, the wood handles are mortised into the drawer front.

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Lots of room for the most popular planes I use. No its not the Anarchist Tool Chest, but it can hold most all the tools I used to make the chest and then some.

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For some space saving I glued up some scrap pieces and attached them to the inside of the lid to hold my sash saw and dovetail saw along with my go to Woodpecker squares.

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Hinges, good ones are hard to find

I am making a Paul Sellers Tool Chest and was in need of some hinges for the lid.  Heading down to the local hardware store I found some basic national hinges.  I bring them back home and open them up and they just did not look like they were worthy of the tool chest I have been working on for the past few months.

So onto my favorite tool website https://toolsforworkingwood.com/ where I found Brusso Hinges.  First the warning, Californians are nuts, I have never eaten a brass hinge.WP_20150427_003

Not to knock the national hinge on the left but the Brusso is on the right is a piece of hardware!

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I picked up this hinge as it has integrated stops.  Turns out my top is too heavy for those but they are built so much better than the national’s I kept them.  I enlarged the holes just a bit and countersunk them some more.  Metal likes a single flute countersink, doesn’t jump or make noise.

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Not a great picture to show the gap as the national hinge is closed, if they were parallel its is almost a 1/8″ gap.  This means much more mortising the hinge into the carcase. The Brusso hinge, hardly a gap at all.  They actually publish PDF’s of the specifications on their website.WP_20150427_009

One last photo of these stunning hinges!  My install was ok, but doesn’t match the perfection of the machining. I’ll post a few blog posts on the tool chest when it is all done.

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